The Domestic Crusaders: Buy the Book and Watch the Play

 

Mixing things up a bit on this Bookish Bitchin cause one of our BcB homies actually wrote this thing. So to keep out the biases and try to keep things real, I’m going to just post the following reviews by a few people you might have heard of. Be sure to buy the book from Amazon or head down to your local Dave Eggers pirate shop or time travel store to cop. And don’t forget about the play if you’re in NYC, which will run through 9/11 weekend. Tickets and info.

“This play is brilliant. Moving. Shapely. Clever. Funny.”
—Toni Morrison

“Wajahat Ali is writing about contemporary and essential matters, a source not only of laughter but, more importantly, of understanding.”
—Yann Martel

“From the deft irony of its title to the tender pain of its ending, The Domestic Crusaders is a moving story of one Pakistani family in America. But it’s more than that. By engaging us in the family’s conflicts, loves, fears and secrets, the play dissolves the easy assumptions and prejudices of the post 9/11 West. Touching; funny; important.”
—Harriett Gilbert, BBC World Service

“A multi-generational romp through the dynamics of family relationships and post-9/11 America. The characters in Wajahat Ali’s funny and biting play spare no one from their sharp barbs—including fellow Muslims. The Domestic Crusaders is what all high art aspires to do—spotlight complicated truths (and contradictions) without offering easy answers. Tension overlaps with comic relief. American pop culture intermingles with Pakistani traditions replanted in the United States. The Domestic Crusaders is a universal story about people whose dreams have carried them to a point of no return. They can’t go back to their lives before 9/11. There is only now. Watching them deal with it is to be spellbound from start to finish. ”
—Jon Curiel, San Francisco Chronicle

Domestic Crusaders is more than just a work of entertainment. It is also Ali’s response to the treatment of Muslims received in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11… it is compelling drama, and there is intergenerational conflict, humor, prejudice, and a dark family secret. The characters, in other words, are not paragons of virtue, which is intentional.”
—Ellis Cose, Newsweek

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