Danger Dogs No More… in LA (I’ll seeya on the 16th Street in The Mission at 11)

In case you were questioning whether bacon wrapped hot dogs in The Mission in SF were better than the ones in L.A., your question has already been answered, cause bacon is now banned from being sold on the streets of L.A. unless vendors purchase a $26,000 hot dog cart that stores the bacon properly. ppsshhhT! Like I’d want bacon wrapped hot dogs THAT clean? Thank god unlicensed vendors still slang sell the “danger dogs”… Too bad they get slapped with heavy fines if caught (and the vendors that abide by the law and sell dogs with no bacon get NO love). New laws that indirectly affect minorities like the Mexican Americans in LA? Gotta love the LA County Health Dept!

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13 thoughts on “Danger Dogs No More… in LA (I’ll seeya on the 16th Street in The Mission at 11)

  1. With all due respect, I disagree. While you are trying to advocate for “minorities” (I prefer the term folks/ppl of color), perhaps you should consider the disproportionately large percentage of folks of color who are diabetic, overweight, or more prone to cancer. Having crap like bacon wrapped hot dogs and the plethora of other fast food joints in poor and immigrant communities contribute to our unhealthy ways of living. If you want to diss the LA county health department for anything, perhaps question why they don’t funnel more money into educating our ppl about eating healthy or provide more health programs for our elders and youth? While I don’t want to see working class folks who earn their living slanging bacon wrapped hot dogs out of a job, I’d rather push for policies and resources to create jobs that will allow these folks to earn a more sustainable living. If you want to contribute to your own unhealthy way of living, I suggest picking up some bacon and wrapping that around a hotdog in your own home rather than pushing for the masses of our folks to engage in that type of eating habit. I’m just saying.

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  2. Your logic makes sense when we’re talking about a McD’s, with its Dollar Menu, operating in low income communities. But it doesn’t with these bacon wrapped hot dogs, which are costing between $3.50-$5. I dare say the people that live in the community are not buying these things at $5 a pop, just the douchebags rolling thru Dodger Stadium after a game or the Mission after a night of clubbing (like myself). My point is that the LA health dept is cracking down on the BACON and not the hot dog, which is disproportionately affecting Mexican Americans (who sell the bacon wrapped dogs) vs. the White hot dog stand owners downtown (who sell kosher dogs with no bacon).

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  3. just because your experiences outside of dodger stadium and late nites out at the mission has you seeing folks like yourself eating these things doesn’t mean that poor/immigrant/working class folks don’t also engage in its consumption during the hours that you are not there. having these types of food in poor communities perpetuates our folks unhealthy diets regardless if you want to admit to it or not.

    additionally, my point is that i’d RATHER channel my advocacy to get the city/county of LA accountable for developing policies that support working class folks into more sustainable jobs rather than having to sell these bacon wrapped dogs to a bunch of drunken douchebags who come into these communities, like the mission and take over ownership as if they’ve built the culture and cultivated history there.

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  4. I am not basing my arguement on what I see after clubbing, I’m saying that i strongly think the people paying $5 for a hot dog are probably not poor. And I don’t see how selling hot dogs on the street is not sustainable? Are you saying that it’s ok to create laws that make certain minority businesses cost prohibitive to operate because you don’t think it provides healthy alternatives to people or because you don’t think it’s sustainable? Should we also ban day laborers from loitering around Home Depots or Loews? Or should we require those companies to create job training and English language classes operated by those companies when new stores open up (as some cities require)? My point is that making a business cost prohibitive to operate, especially in this economic climate and especially affecting only minorities is wrong. This isn’t crack, this is a hot dog.

    I am fine with LA creating policies that educate people on health and business practices, whatever. But that’s a whole other issue.

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  5. chances are these vendors have a sliding scale when it comes to their prices based on the type of folks engaging in business. your price maybe 5 bucks, but a local from that community may have a lower price. that’s how vendor businesses work. so yes, everyone is eating these dogs.

    for the most part, these jobs aren’t sustainable because there is no health care, no retirement plan, no sick leave, no paid vacation, no comp time, you get my point? if a vendor is out sick, who’s gonna pay him sick leave? who pays for his medical bills? when he’s 65 and ready to retire, how much of that money he was making selling bacon wrapped hotdogs went into a pension or a 401k? so no, these jobs are not sustainable. how are folks of color in these communities building any type of asset for themselves? how will we ever lift ourselves out of poverty if the only jobs that we have are hand to mouth?

    just because the economy is bad, is not an excuse to continue unhealthy habits in poor community. that shit is already happening constantly. walmart and fast food companies are the only ones seeing profits during these times.

    i’m not saying to strip these folks out of a job and that’s the end all. i know this is what is instant and the only current option that they may have at the moment, but if you want to advocate for working class folks to have healthy and sustainable living, then do it in a responsible way that looks at the long term effects of working class/poor/immigrant communities, which should encompass their health and economic stability.

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  6. I agree with all your points, but what you’re arguing is that I shouldn’t be complaining about them shutting down these businesses cause

    1. They’re selling junk food in low income communities
    2. I should be doing long range advocacy for sustainable job growth in low income communities and communities of color instead of even mentioning the closure of these businesses because these businesses aren’t viable?

    I think we’ve heard this argument with our blog before, that we’re only armchair advocates and not doing anything about it. But that’s all a blog is for. I saw an injustice and I wrote about it. To say the business provides an unhealthy food option is another argument and to say that these folks need sustainable jobs is a significant concern too, but it too is a different argument. My argument is that this law is adversely affecting Latino Americans and low income people more than white people. Bottom line.

    And if you want me to do advocacy work for sustainable/local jobs in communities of color and low income communities in addition to bitching about small time stuff like this, then I’d be happy to talk about a policy I’m writing up for work this month in that subject…

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  7. if you want to write about an injustice when it comes to policies that hinder chicanos/latinos, southeast asians, and african immigrants from making a living, then you should question why the government and policy makers haven’t done more in the past to get our folks into other types of jobs or why the overall permitting process for any small business owner is horrendous, regardless of whether or not they are selling bacon.

    blogging about junk food and tying that to a social justice issue such as business discrimination does not do anything for poor commnunities, in which junk food has always been a problem. my issue with this post isn’t that i’m OK with LA shutting down these businesses, my issue is that its irresponsible to make this out to be a social justice issue without connecting it to a bigger problem. it’s not like its a surprise that LA continues to make shit harder for poc owned businesses. but if you’re going to discuss that issue and bring in danger dogs as your example- then it’s counter productive. i beg to differ that junk food isn’t like a lower scale crack. crack kills, so does diabetes and obesity.

    bottom line is that if you’re now in a position of designing policies to create sustainable jobs in poor/low-income communities (as you so pretentiously mentioned) make sure that you’re asking folks in those communities what it is that they really need and not assuming that they’re OK with selling danger dogs because its $5 a pop and therefore, in your eyes, sustainable. developing viable options for folks to make a sustainable living, while positively affecting the overall community is CHANGE that should and needs to happen. perpetuating cycles of unhealthy living needs to end.

    this is bullshit and i’m going to get lunch and trust that it won’t be a bacon wrapped anything…why? b/c they wouldn’t have shit like that in places like shallow alto, where business owners are sustainable and not selling food that would kill off white ppl.

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  8. We are seriously arguing different things here. First off, I didn’t WANT to discuss people of power targeting low income, communities of color and just so happened to use the danger dog example. I was forwarded the danger dog example and said, “Hey, this is affecting low income, communities of color more than White rich folks”. Should I have just quoted the article and said NOTHING? You don’t see the injustice in this at all? You want me to be silent on this?

    And HELL NO do I think these jobs are sustainable. YES, these jobs don’t provide health care or day care or long term job growth. But you know what other job doesn’t provide any of these benefits? NO JOBS. Oh, and did you know that NO JOB also doesn’t provide MONEY? So are you advocating the removal of this entire sector because its not healthy food and not sustainable for the business owner without an alternative plan? I’m all for that, if you have an alternative. But slipping the mat from under these folks without a back up is irresponsible.

    And yes, I’m a pretentious fuck for actually working at a job doing exactly what you’re telling me I SHOULD do.

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  9. I think you guys both have great points but you guys are taking two completely different angles on the problem, which means you’ll never find common ground. I think Vu’s point was to simply highlight how policies made in the spirit of health very often have unintended consequences on people of color and low income communities. I think the conversation about lack of access to healthy foods, disproportionately targeting low income communities of color with ads for fast food, etc. is a completely different discussion (that we should prob have…make a post!!!). That said, great points Sher! 

    Lets get back to talking about dogs and how ill never go to LA now that they are banning bacon!

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  10. if you didn’t WANT to discuss ppl in positions of power targeting working class/chicano communities then why did you bring up the LA county health dept targeting chicano hotdog vendors? my issue is NOT about you being silent about LA officials obviously targeting chicano hot dog vendors, my issue is that there is MORE to this than just saying fuck LA Co health dept for not letting them sell bacon wrapped hotdogs. if you’re as conscious as you say that you are, then YES you should have elaborated and said, fuck, the only thing that our folks are able to do is slang unhealthy foods in our own communities b/c ppl in positions of power make it difficult for our folks to do anything else and now they are taking that away too. as oppose to doing what you did and just tying bacon wrapped hot dogs as if it’s the shit and now our working class chicanos can’t sell it anymore. boofuckinghoo. the fact is, the system is set up that ALL we can do is sell things that perpetual unhealthy cycles in communities of color in order to make a living. am i saying that NO JOB is better than this job? obviously NOT. i’m saying that if YOU want to be an advocate for folks of color and bring up the issues that affect poor communities be responsible in framing it and connecting it to shit that affects the overall health of folks’ lives and know that these vicious cycles NEED to end. and they won’t end if people keep glorifying the unhealthy ways of living and then tying them into serious problems like the lack of sustainable jobs.

    we’ve reached an impasse and i’ll agree to disagree with your approach. nuff said.

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  11. You want me to expound on a 2 minute Drew Carey bit about danger dogs into an analysis on LA’s low income, Latino Americans’ health and economic sustainability. I wrote a blog about danger dogs and the LA Health Dept. Unrelated blogs. I don’t think this is the forum to discuss the inter-connectivity of health, economic sustainability, and minority America. But i think our running commentary in the comments helps round that debate out. So that’s something positive.

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  12. chances are these vendors have a sliding scale when it comes to their prices based on the type of folks engaging in business. your price maybe 5 bucks, but a local from that community may have a lower price. that's how vendor businesses work. so yes, everyone is eating these dogs.

    for the most part, these jobs aren't sustainable because there is no health care, no retirement plan, no sick leave, no paid vacation, no comp time, you get my point? if a vendor is out sick, who's gonna pay him sick leave? who pays for his medical bills? when he's 65 and ready to retire, how much of that money he was making selling bacon wrapped hotdogs went into a pension or a 401k? so no, these jobs are not sustainable. how are folks of color in these communities building any type of asset for themselves? how will we ever lift ourselves out of poverty if the only jobs that we have are hand to mouth?

    just because the economy is bad, is not an excuse to continue unhealthy habits in poor community. that shit is already happening constantly. walmart and fast food companies are the only ones seeing profits during these times.

    i'm not saying to strip these folks out of a job and that's the end all. i know this is what is instant and the only current option that they may have at the moment, but if you want to advocate for working class folks to have healthy and sustainable living, then do it in a responsible way that looks at the long term effects of working class/poor/immigrant communities, which should encompass their health and economic stability.;. All the best!!

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